kqedscience
kqedscience:

A Quest for Vegan Cheese That Actually Tastes Like Cheese"The problem with a lot of vegan cheese is that it’s just not very cheesy. You know: gooey, melty, bubbly. Vegan cheese, with a few notable exceptions (Kite Hill, for example) tends toward rubbery.Well, now a team of a dozen Bay Area scientists is working to biohack a vegan cheese that can be made into a wide variety of flavors and textures.”
Learn more at KQED Science.

kqedscience:

A Quest for Vegan Cheese That Actually Tastes Like Cheese

"The problem with a lot of vegan cheese is that it’s just not very cheesy. You know: gooey, melty, bubbly. Vegan cheese, with a few notable exceptions (Kite Hill, for example) tends toward rubbery.

Well, now a team of a dozen Bay Area scientists is working to biohack a vegan cheese that can be made into a wide variety of flavors and textures.”

Learn more at KQED Science.

spacejamkin

every episode of scooby doo

  • guy: something spooky's happening
  • fred: k we'll come check it out
  • fred: daphne, velma come with me
  • daphne: lol okei
  • shaggy: but scooby and i are terrified of everything why do you always fucking send us off alone
  • velma: shut up you two
  • shaggy and scooby: *run into monster*
  • scooby: RAGGY
  • shaggy: *oblivious to everything*
  • scooy: RAAAAGGGGGY
  • shaggy: zoinks!
  • *the monster chases them accompanied by fun music: part 1*
  • shaggy and scooby: *meet up with fred, velma, and daphne*
  • fred: what happened?
  • shaggy: M-M-MONSTER
  • velma: uh oh
  • monster: boo
  • all: AAAAH
  • *the monster chases them accompanied by fun music: part 2*
  • *they run into one room and come out of another one, i don't fucking know how that's possible*
  • velma: my glasses! i lost my glasses!
  • monster: *picks up velma's glasses and hands them to her*
  • velma: thanks. ....JINKIES!
  • *the monster chases them accompanied by fun music: part 3*
  • monster: whoops i tripped
  • scooby: i captured you
  • *they pull the monster's mask off*
  • fred: oh look it's the suspicious guy we met at the beginning of the episode who was super suspicious and greedy and he wanted money
  • suspicious guy: and i would've gotten away with it too if it weren't for you meddling kids and your dumb dog
  • scooby: ROOBY ROOBY ROO
  • all: *laugh*
biomedicalephemera
biomedicalephemera:

Cerebellum and ocular system in the human
In vertebrates, the eyeballs are direct extensions of the brain; that is, they evolved after the brain, and are literally unimpeded access to the cerebellum and cerebrum. Because of this, many ocular tumors or injuries can be far more dangerous to the brain than growths or injuries on any other part of the skull.
 Anatome ex omnium veterum recentiorumque observationibus. Thomas Bartholin, 1673.

biomedicalephemera:

Cerebellum and ocular system in the human

In vertebrates, the eyeballs are direct extensions of the brain; that is, they evolved after the brain, and are literally unimpeded access to the cerebellum and cerebrum. Because of this, many ocular tumors or injuries can be far more dangerous to the brain than growths or injuries on any other part of the skull.

Anatome ex omnium veterum recentiorumque observationibus. Thomas Bartholin, 1673.

biomedicalephemera

biomedicalephemera:

The human brain, its nervous projections, layers, and cortical blood vessels

Though we’re probably subconsciously aware of our brains on a day-to-day basis, most of us generally don’t pay much direct attention to them. Of course, lots can go wrong in the mind, resulting in mental illness, physical illness, and in the worst cases, death.

But aside from everything that can go wrong in the brain, did you know that the mind, despite being only 2% of the average body mass, uses almost 25% of the oxygen we consume, and over 70% of the glucose we ingest? It’s a tiny organ, but it manages almost everything outside of the parasympathetic nervous system, and it requires a relatively high energy input (especially compared to other organs in the body) just to function on a daily basis.

The cells in the brain require, on average, twice as much pure energy as other cells, just to function, and when you’re focusing hard on a big paper, or trying to brainstorm and be creative, your mind is in overdrive! Even if you haven’t moved in two hours, if you’re focusing hard on an essay and coming up with lots of great ideas, your lunch isn’t going to last long, with what your brain is demanding.

Since it’s not a muscle, and you’re not necessarily doing anything physical when you think, it can be hard to believe that the brain needs so much energy.

However, the cerebellum, and especially the frontal and prefrontal cortices (where our personality and “creative minds” exist, for the most part) demand more energy than our stomachs, livers, spleens, and kidneys combined! Depending on how your brain is wired, that fact can make it extremely exhausting to deal with other people, as you’re engaging your prefrontal cortex to a high degree. Thinking hard and being creative can sap your energy, too - that’s why I always had an apple or banana to eat midway through my morning courses!

Tabulae Anatomicae. Bartholomeo Eustachi, 1570 (Published 1783).

The Anatomy of the Brain, Explained in a Series of Engravings. Charles Bell, 1803.

kqedscience
kqedscience:

Europe’s Rosetta Spacecraft Will Soon Ride a Comet
“In November, things will get truly exciting when Rosetta launches a landing probe, Philae, to a historic, first-ever-of-its-kind landing on the surface of a comet. That should be as exciting as when we received the first pictures from the surface of the Moon, or Mars, or Titan.”
Learn more from astronomer Ben Burress of Chabot Space & Science Center at KQED Science.
Pictured above: Comet 67p/Churyumov-Gerasimenko captured by Rosetta spacecraft on approach

kqedscience:

Europe’s Rosetta Spacecraft Will Soon Ride a Comet

In November, things will get truly exciting when Rosetta launches a landing probe, Philae, to a historic, first-ever-of-its-kind landing on the surface of a comet. That should be as exciting as when we received the first pictures from the surface of the Moon, or Mars, or Titan.”

Learn more from astronomer Ben Burress of Chabot Space & Science Center at KQED Science.

Pictured above: Comet 67p/Churyumov-Gerasimenko captured by Rosetta spacecraft on approach

spring-of-mathematics

spring-of-mathematics:

Polytopes in Geometry.

In elementary geometry, a polytope is a geometric object with flat sides, which exists in any general number of dimensions. A polygon is a polytope in two dimensions, a polyhedron in three dimensions, and so on in higher dimensions (such as a polychoron in four dimensions). Some theories further generalize the idea to include such objects as unbounded polytopes (apeirotopes and tessellations), and abstract polytopes. When referring to an n-dimensional generalization, the term n-polytope is used. For example, a polygon is a 2-polytope, a polyhedron is a 3-polytope, and a polychoron is a 4-polytope…See more : History and Different approaches to definition at Polytope on Wikipedia.
In  “Universal constructors in polytopal graph theory”, a article about Polytopal graph theory, the author wrote:
Polytopal graph theory is concerned with the graphs formed by the edges and vertices of polytopes. The graph of a simple polytope contains all of the necessary information to recover its full combinatorial structure in polynomial time, and thus is equivalent in a strong sense to the object. These objects are both mathematically and aesthetically beautiful as well as practically relevant.  Properties of polytopal graphs are linked with a number of important algorithmic questions about polytopes such as the complexity of  linear programming and the convergence of randomized algorithms - Source.

Image: Polytope movie page (Hypercubes) by Komei Fukuda - A Catalog of Uniform Polytopes by Jenn - Polytope on Wikipedia&  Cubic Soap by Jeff Buchbinder.